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12 Types Of Network - Know The Full Details About It

Types Of Networks

In the long run, technological development has set off different types of networks to meet our needs and future technological advances. Reduce the weak point of your networks, and present network monitoring instruments have never been more important.

We've made a list of common network types and guided picking one.

Find out about the most well-known network geographies and wordings

Comprehend how to pick between different types of network connections

So whether you're a network vet or managing a new network, you'll make certain to get something from this article. We should bounce right in!

Types of Networks

  1. Personal Area Network (PAN)

  2. Local Area Network (LAN)

  3. Wide Area Network (WAN)

  4. Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)

  5. Campus Area Network (CAN)

  6. Metropolitan Area Network (MAN)

  7. Storage Area Network (SAN)

  8. System-Area Network (SAN)

  9. Passive Optical Local Area Network (POLAN)

  10. Enterprise Private Network (EPN)

  11. Virtual Private Network (VPN)

  12. Home Area Network (HAN)

These networks are explained as follows below.

1. Personal Area Network (PAN)

A personal area network (PAN) is a PC network organized around a person. A PAN typically includes a computer, a printer, a smartphone, and other devices. The main purpose of a PAN is to allow the individual to share data and resources between devices.

A PAN can be as simple as two devices connected by a cable or a more complex network that includes multiple devices and connections. The most common type of PAN is a wireless PAN, which uses Bluetooth or WiFi to connect devices.

Benefits:

  • No extra space requires.

Uses:

  • Gives information transmission among gadgets like PCs, cell phones, tablets, and individual advanced associates.

Examples:

  • The connection of a Bluetooth earpiece and a cell phone.

2. Local Area Network (LAN)

A local area network (LAN) is a network that connects computer systems and devices within a small geographic region, like a home, office, or building. A LAN may be as small as a single computer or as large as a group of computers in a large office. A LAN typically uses wired or wireless technology to connect devices.

Benefits:

  • LAN setup is not outrageously costly.

Uses:

  • A LAN empowers clients to interface with internal servers, sites, and different LANs that have a place with a similar wide region organization (WAN).

Examples:

  • Small business networks and WiFi networks of home.

3. Wide Area Network (WAN)

A wide area network (WAN) is a computer network that covers a large geographic area. WANs can connect local area networks (LANs) in different locations. WANs are often used to connect corporate networks or multiple sites within an organization. WANs can be implemented using various technologies, including point-to-point links, circuit-switched networks, and packet-switched networks.

Benefits:

  • WANs associate LANs and different organizations so clients and PCs in an isolated area can speak with customers and PCs in different regions.

Uses:

  • WANs can help with communication, sharing of information, and much more between devices from around the world through a WAN provider. 

Examples:

  • A bank, including its branch offices and ATMs, is another example of an organization using a WAN.

4. Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)

A WLAN is a local network that uses wireless technologies to connect devices. This network is often used in homes and small businesses as it is more affordable and easier to install than a wired network. WLANs use radio frequencies to communicate, which means they can be susceptible to interference from other devices that use the same frequencies. To combat this, most WLANs use encryption to protect data transmissions.

Benefits:

  • WLAN reduces physical wires, so it's a versatile way of communication.

Uses:

  • Users can move around the coverage area, often a home or small office, while maintaining a network connection.

Examples:

  • Internet-enabled home appliances and devices.

5. Campus Area Network (CAN)

A Campus Area Network (CAN) is a PC network that connects devices within a specific geographic region, like a school, office, or building. A CAN typically use wired or wireless communication to connect devices like computers, printers, and servers. A CAN may also provide connectivity to the Internet or other wide area networks (WANs).

Benefits:

  • You can easily divide information among various clients or access it from a distance on the off chance that you keep it on other associated gadgets.

Uses:

  • Interconnect networks in limited geographical localities like the university campus, military bases, corporate campuses, etc.

Examples:

  • A university campus network, a corporate campus network.

6. Metropolitan Area Network (MAN)

A metropolitan area network (MAN) is a computer network that spans a metropolitan area. A MAN usually consists of a collection of local area networks (LANs) connected using high-speed links. A MAN often provides high-speed connections to Internet service providers (ISPs), which allows users to connect to the Internet at high speeds.

Benefits:

  • Helps in cost-effective sharing of average assets, for example, printers.

Uses:

  • High bandwidth is enabled by the dedicated links of a metropolitan area network.

Examples:

  • Many cities provide free WiFi access to all residents as a large single MAN.

7. Storage Area Network (SAN)

A storage area network (SAN) is a specialized, high-speed network that provides block-level storage access for applications and file servers. A SAN typically uses Fibre Channel (FC) or Ethernet protocols. It connects servers to storage devices, such as hard disk drives (HDDs) and solid-state drives (SSDs).

A SAN can greatly improve storage performance and availability for applications and file servers. Businesses can consolidate their storage devices into a single, centralized location using a SAN. This can reduce storage costs and improve storage management. In addition, a SAN can provide high-speed storage access for applications that require it, such as video streaming and online transaction processing (OLTP).

Benefits:

  • Fast backups, improve scalability and increase data security.

Uses:

  • A SAN is commonly utilized to unite storage. 

Examples:

  • It's normal for a PC framework, like a server, to incorporate at least one nearby stockpiling gadget.

8. System-Area Network (SAN)

A system-area network (SAN) is a computer network that connects storage devices, servers, and other components in a data center. A SAN typically uses a high-speed network such as Fibre Channel or InfiniBand to improve the performance and availability of data storage and servers.

Benefits:

  • Can link a cluster of computers.

Uses:

  • To determine data routing.

Examples:

  • Storage area networks, Server-to-server applications, and processor-to-processor applications.

9. Passive Optical Local Area Network (POLAN)

A Passive Optical Local Area Network (POLAN) is an optical network that uses passive components to connect terminals to a central office. POLANs are typically used in fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) applications, where they can provide high-speed data services over long distances.

POLANs are typically composed of two main components: optical splitters and optical couplers. Optical splitters divide the optical signal from the central office into multiple signals sent to different terminals. Optical couplers combine the signals from multiple terminals and send them back to the central office.

Benefits:

  • Can split a single optical fiber to connect multiple customers, which translates into cost savings.

Uses:

  • Brings fiber optic cabling and flags all or almost the entire way to the end user.

Examples:

  •  Data format transparent.

10. Enterprise Private Network (EPN)

An enterprise private network (EPN) is a private network owned and operated by a single organization. An EPN may connect various locations and devices within the organization, such as branch offices, data centers, and individual computers. 

An EPN is typically implemented using various technologies, such as leased lines, virtual private networks (VPNs), and private intranets. These technologies work together to create a single, cohesive network that is secure and reliable. 

Benefits:

  • Help to centralize IT resources.

Uses:

  • It helps enterprise companies with many disparate offices connect those offices to each in a secure way over a network.

Examples:

  •  Remote offices, shops, production sites, etc.

11. Virtual Private Network (VPN)

A Virtual Private Network, or VPN, is a private network that uses public infrastructure, such as the Internet, to provide remote access to an organization's data and resources. A VPN can securely connect to an organization's internal network from anywhere.

VPNs utilize an assortment of safety protocols to encrypt data and to ensure that only authorized users can access the network. The most common security protocols used in VPNs are Internet Protocol Security (IPSec), Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP), and Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP).

Benefits:

  • Anonymous browsing.

Uses:

  • It keeps unapproved people from listening to the traffic and permits the user to lead work remotely.

Examples:

  • IPsec-based WAN.

12. Home Area Network (HAN)

A home area network (HAN) is a computer network that connects electronic devices in a home. A HAN typically includes a broadband Internet connection, a router, and various attached devices, such as computers, printers, and game consoles. A HAN can be used to share files and printers, play music and videos, and even control home appliances.

Benefits:

  • Allows the Smart Grid applications to communicate intelligently by providing centralized access to multiple appliances and devices and has a proactive approach to energy savings.

Uses:

  • Connects a customer's eligible energy monitoring device to a smart meter.

Examples:

TVs, Smartphones, Thermostats, Lights, Ac, Sensors, and Home assistants, such as Alexa and Google Home.

How to pick the right network type for you

There are many factors to consider when picking the right network type for your organization. The first is to determine the size and scope of your network. Are you looking to connect a few devices within a small office, or do you need to connect a large number of devices across multiple locations? The next step is to consider the applications and services you will use on your network. Will you be using voice and video conferencing, or just data? Do you need to connect to the Internet, or will a private network suffice? Finally, you need to consider your budget. Different network types can vary widely in cost, so it's important to find one that fits your financial needs.



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